Modeling a neighborhood with Flux Site Extractor, GIS data and Revit

Since my last post, I kept on working on urban development. I particularly think about importing GIS data into our usual authoring tools. My experience with Infraworks was interesting, but it is still difficult to use this data in a Revit model.

The most promising resource out there for creating a context in a Revit model is the Flux Site Extractor. You select an area, add some features to extract and send them to a Flux project.

The Flux Site Extractor interface

After retrieving this data in my Flux Site Project, I use the Flux Dynamo nodes to get the topography as a mesh, extract the vertices of this mesh as points and use these points to create a toposurface in Revit.

Creating a toposurface from the Flux Site Extractor

Building profiles and heights came from OpenStreetMap, and aren’t accurate enough to be used for site analysis. But I am using building profiles to draw on a plan view the footprint of every building retreived with Flux. This will help me futher down the road to align my buildings on the toposurface.

Buildings footprints drawn in a plan view

I found more accurate data on the parisian buildings on the APUR Open Data plateform. I download this data as a shapefile containing every building in Paris.

Obviously, this dataset is too large to be imported as it in Revit. I am using QGIS, an open source GIS application, to extract a subset of this file. To do so, I draw a polygon encompassing the few city blocks I want to retrieve and use the “Clip” function to create a new shapefile containing only the selected buildings.

Isolate the propers city blocks

I am using the DynamoGIS package to import this shapefile into Revit. These nodes allow me to read the file and extract the shapes of the buildings.

The most difficult thing here was to include inner boundaries in a building shape. These boundaries are not taken into account by the Surface.ByPatch node. I manage to split the first surface (the largest) using the inner curve. This allow me to create the hollowed surface.

Highlight of inner boundaries

The DynamoGIS include nodes to query any value associated with shapes. I am using them to retrieve building heights in the dataset and extrude my buildings at their proper height.

Since it is GIS data, I am using a nice tip from LandArch to move my geometry near the project base point, and make it usable in Revit.

I am using the FamilyInstance.ByGeometry node from the great Spring nodes of Dimitar Venkov to create the buildings as mass families.

This Dynamo definition create a mass family for every building in the shapefile, extruded up to its actual height. Combined with the toposurface created with Flux, this look like an actual neighborhood, where you can think about massing and site integration directly in Revit.

Site integration of a project

This process still has a few issues. The buildings aren’t adjusted at the toposurface and aligning them with the toposurface created with the Flux Site Extractor involve some manipulations. I still have some work to do on this process to streamline it, and get a more accurate representation of an existing site.

Another view of the project

 

Flux Dashboard

Since my last article, Flux has made a lot of progress. Along with their plugins for Excel, Grasshopper and Dynamo, the Flux team has recently released their connectors for Revit and SketchUp. They are also developing a series of tools that use the Flux platform for calculations or specific collaboration tasks.

Among these tools, Thomas points me to the Live Data Dashboard, a real-time visualization tool for your Flux data.

I have tried various solution for displaying data extracted from a Revit model, from Excel spreadsheet to Tableau, but these solutions generally fell short when it comes to real-time update. The Dashboard can be a solution, since its values always reflect the latest Flux values.

After login with my Flux account into the Flux Dashboard, I was able to select a Data Key from one of my project as a data source for a bar chart.

Image

Using properties extracted from the Rooms of one of my project, I tried to display my 951 rooms all at one, and came up with a rather messy chart:

Image [1]

The problem here is that the Flux dashboard does not support values that are not in a tabular format, with mean you cannot yet use directly the value uploaded from the Revit plugin. Furthermore, the Dashboard does not process any of the data you are feeding in, so you have to prepare your visualization beforehand, in Dynamo or in the Flux Flow.

I go back to the Dynamo plugin, and use a rather simple definition to retrieve all rooms, and regroup key values in nested lists. I use the List.GroupByKey node to regroup rooms’ area per level, and create a list of levels, with the number of room and their area in each level.

List2

I upload these values in a new Flux Data Key, and use this Data Key as a source for a new, and way more interesting Chart Bar.

Image [2]

Once the values are properly sorted in Dynamo, they fit nicely on the graph, and are automatically updated as the values evolve in our Revit model.

Using the same principle, I add a few node to my Dynamo definition, and upload the resulting values to the Dashboard.

Image [3]

I also try to display geometry in the Flux Viewport, but for some reason, I wasn’t able to see anything on the dashboard. I will have to keep trying on this one.

After having built this great dashboard, it is pretty easy to share it, using a Flux Data Key to store it. You just have to make sure everyone has access to all the projects linked to the dashboard.

The Flux Dashboard is a great idea. As long as you use Flux as the main data repository, the Flux Dashboard can display is fair share of information to everyone without having to dig into the models. However, the Flux dashboard is not (yet) an Excel spreadsheet, and won’t regroup or sort your data directly, and you still have some work upfront to prepare this data for visualization.